Open data as a term is relatively new, but the concept is not. The idea that information should be freely available for unrestricted use has been around for awhile, but didn’t really take off before the rise of the Internet made it feasible to share data quickly and globally. Add in the recent popularity of big data, and it makes a lot of sense that public datasets are on the rise as well. Enormous amounts of valuable data, including everything from climate projections to genome sequences, have been made available by the organizations that own them and are now free for download: on Amazon Public Data Sets, Data.gov, and more. The possibilities are endless, as researchers, businesses, and citizens from around the world have access to data that would otherwise be extremely expensive and time-consuming to collect. The challenge that follows is how these researchers and businesses are going to handle these large datasets, including storage, organization, and analysis.